WSJ asks: “Are vaccines fueling new covid variants?”

WSJ asks: “Are vaccines fueling new covid variants?”

There is another new covid “variant” (or so we are told) that is spreading across the Northeast. And The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) admits that covid “vaccines” are making people more susceptible to it.

XBB, as they are calling this latest variant, is not necessarily any deadlier than previous variants. It is also a lot different, we are told, than previous variants in that it evades “protection” from the injections.

“Growing evidence also suggests that repeated vaccinations may make people more susceptible to XBB and could be fueling the virus’s rapid evolution,” writes Allysia Finley, admitting what many of us have known for years now.

XBB supposedly belongs to the Omicron (anagram for Moronic) family of variants, which comes with “numerous descendants,” according to Finley, “many of which have popped up in different regions of the world curiously bearing some of the same mutations.”

A study published on December 19 explains that the rapid and simultaneous emergence of all these variants possessing “enormous growth advantages is unprecedented.” The reason, we now know, is the jabs.

“Under selective evolutionary pressures, the virus appears to have developed mutations that enable it to transmit more easily and escape antibodies elicited by vaccines and prior infection,” Finley clarifies. (Related: Here is more proof showing that covid injections are spreading more variants).

Pre-print study says covid bivalent “booster” jab responsible for spreading new variants

Another study currently in pre-print contains similar revelations. This one looked at the so-called bivalent “booster” jab for covid, which authorities are pushing on the masses as the solution to all the new variants.

Workers at the Cleveland Clinic were used to assess the efficacy of bivalent boosters, which were found to provide “modest protection.” The key sentence in that study, though, is one specifying that “the virus strains dominant in the community were those represented in the vaccine.”

This would seem to suggest that the variants supposedly covered by bivalent boosters at any given time just so happen to be the very same ones that continue to spread like wildfire, particularly among the “fully vaccinated.”

In Finley’s article, it is further admitted that covid “vaccines” provide poor and inadequate protection against new “strains” of the virus that come along.

As opposed to natural immunity, which is generalized, jab “immunity” is strain-specific (or so we are told), meaning when new strains come along there is no available protection against them.

“Bivalent vaccines that target the Wuhan and BA.5 variants (or breakthrough infections with the latter) prompt the immune system to produce antibodies that target viral regions the two strains have in common,” Finley writes.

“XBB has evolved to elude antibodies induced by the vaccines and breakthrough infections.”

This “immune imprinting” caused by the injections, as they are calling it, was also addressed in a New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) study published last month. That one, along with another one published this month in Cell, both show that those who get injected are only protected against older strains of the virus because their immune systems were imprinted, aka damaged, to not generally recognize all mutations of viral invaders.

“A bivalent booster only slightly increased antibodies against XBB,” Finley writes. “Experts nevertheless claim that boosters improve protection against XBB. That’s disinformation, to use their favored term.”

“It might not be a coincidence that XBB surged this fall in Singapore, which has among the highest vaccination and booster rates in the world. Over the past several weeks a XBB strain has become predominant in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Massachusetts, making up about three-quarters of virus samples that have been genetically sequenced.”

The latest news about covid jabs can be found at Immunization.news.

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