Pentagon says test findings on UFO wreckage could “change our lives forever”


(Planet-Today) More disclosure is coming from the feds after the Pentagon admitted that it has been holding onto and testing wreckage from various crashes of unidentified flying objects (UFOs).

(Article by Ethan Huff republished from NaturalNews.com)

A Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) letter obtained by The Sun reveals that researcher Anthony Bragalia wrote to the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) asking for details about UFO material, to which it was revealed that the Pentagon is in possession of many different kinds.

“This could include physical debris recovered by personnel of the Department of Defense as residue, flotsam, shot-off material or crashed material from UAPS (unidentified aerial phenomenon) or unidentified flying objects,” Bragalia writes.

Some 154 pages of test results were released by the DIA showing that the federal government has identified unique materials with “extraordinary capabilities,” including the ability to make things invisible or even slow down the speed of light.

The Pentagon currently holds a mysterious “memory” metal called Nitinol, for instance, that remembers its original shape when folded. This is just one of many materials that the Pentagon in a “stunning admission” revealed to exist.

“The Pentagon has admitted to holding and testing anomalous debris from UFOs,” Bragalia told The Sun. “They have been able to learn some things about the materials of construction which hold tremendous promise as futuristic materials which will change our lives forever.”

What other secrets does the Pentagon hold about alien life?

Bragalia first filed his request back in 2017, and it took the DIA three years to respond and fulfill it. Previously, the Pentagon admitted that it has been studying UFOs under the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP).

“The article mentioned that anomalous debris from UFOs (now called UAPs) was being analyzed by a private defense contractor,” Bragalia notes. “Material evidence such as UFO debris has been a focus of my research.”

“My Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request was very specific, seeking the test results of UFO/UAP debris, not material already known to science,” he added.

In Bragalia’s view, some of the debris being tested by the Pentagon may have come from the infamous Roswell incident of 1947, in which a UFO crashed in New Mexico.

“The inclusion of advanced technical reports on Nitinol is curious,” he says. “Nitinol is a shape-memory alloy that ‘remembers’ its original shape when folded or crushed, and snaps back seamlessly and instantly.”

“This memory metal characteristic was reported by many witnesses at Roswell.”

The Pentagon, however, has not indicated from where the Nitinol came. It also suggested in the letter that the Nitinol may or may not have come from an “alien” source.

“They are omitting information on the chemical and elemental composition of the material as well as its origin,” Bragalia says.

“They have omitted the names of the involved scientists as well, but I have since learned some of their names and will be contacting them.”

The testing, according to the letter posted to Bragalia’s bog, was carried out by Bigelow Aerospace, a DoD private contractor based out of Las Vegas. Last March, the company laid off its entire staff due to the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis.

It is currently unknown where the UFO material Bigelow had in its possession is now being kept.

“All former personnel have refused me any real comment,” Bragalia stated, mysteriously, about how the laid-off employees treated him. “I suspect the material has been returned to the Pentagon.”

Commenting on the story, one reader of The Sun speculated that with the vast size of the universe, surely there are other places out there where “intelligent life” exists beyond just Earth.

“Logica and probability concludes that we are not alone,” this same commenter added.

More related news can be found at UFOs.news.

Sources for this article include:

The-Sun.com

NaturalNews.com


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