The three states most likely to suffer from power grid collapse


Late last year, the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NAERC), a not-for-profit international regulatory authority, had warned that much of the United States power grid – "the only major power grid without a plan" – and parts of Canada are vulnerable to major winter storms.

This was confirmed by the Edison Electric Institute (EEI), which stated that 70 percent of power outages in the U.S. are weather-related, caused by natural weather phenomena such as ice, lighting, rain, snow, wind and even dust.

For instance, millions of households went without power when winter storm "Elliot" hit the Eastern United States in December 2022.

Knowing the places most likely to suffer from a power grid collapse is crucial for any serious prepper.

States with the least reliable power grids

From the latest electrical reliability data released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) on Sep. 20, 2023, here are the top three states with the worst power grids, according to Generator Decision.

Louisiana

The Jazz capital of the world has an aging electrical grid, which does not keep up with extreme weather. When Hurricane Ida, a deadly and extremely destructive Category 4 Atlantic hurricane made its landfall in Louisiana in 2021, nearly a million people lost power and many of the State’s residents lived without electricity for more than a month, PBS reported.

On Sep.23, 2021, the Louisiana Public Service Commission said: "Sometimes, there just isn’t enough electricity to meet unusually high demands. Power is never guaranteed in Louisiana, especially at the end of August/beginning of September."

While Louisiana is known for its colorful history and having a "flair all its own" with its amazing architecture, Mardi Gras, great cuisine, fantastic music and more, you would not want to be in any one of its cities that have been identified as the most dangerous cities – especially during blackouts.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) included Alexandria, Bastrop, Crowley, Hammond, Leesville, Marksville, Monroe, Opelousas, Walker and West Monroe as the FBI’s 10 most dangerous cities in Louisiana for 2023.

Oregon

Oregon’s system shares power with much of that West Coast grid called the Western Interconnection.

Most grid infrastructure in the Beaver State is built above ground due to cheaper construction costs. However, above-ground power lines are more vulnerable to weather events.

In a post released on Dec. 14, 2023, the Oregon Citizens’ Utility Board (CUB) described its grid as "increasingly at risk" with extreme weather events – wildfires and ice storms – "becoming more frequent and longer."

On Jan 19, Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) reported that the FBI was warning utilities of neo-Nazi or "white supremacists’ plots to take down the nation’s power grid as a string of deliberate physical attacks on electrical substations unfolded in Oregon and Washington states in 2022."

According to an FBI memo obtained by OPB and KUOW: "The individuals of concern believe that an attack on electrical infrastructure will contribute to their ideological goal of causing societal collapse and a subsequent race war in the United States."

Since mid-November 2022, Portland General Electric, Bonneville Power Administration, Cowlitz County Public Utility District and Puget Sound Energy have confirmed a total of six separate attacks on electrical substations they manage in Oregon and Washington that have left thousands of residents without electricity for days.

An email from a security specialist with the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland, obtained by OPB and KUOW, reportedly provided details of the attacks, "including setting the control houses on fire, forced entry and sabotage of intricate electrical control systems, causing short circuits by tossing chains across the overhead busywork and ballistic attack with small caliber firearms."

Due to concerns about the specialist’s safety, Bonneville Power officials requested that the specialist’s name be withheld.

Texas

Unlike most other states in the U.S., Texas predominantly operates on its own independent power grid – the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). However, this isolation also means "it cannot readily tap into neighboring grids when faced with a deficit," according to Paschal, a company that provides professional heating, air conditioning, plumbing and electrical services.

From freezing winter storms that paralyze power plants to scorching summer days that can overload the Texas grid, extreme weather puts more strain on the system, especially as metropolitan areas, like Austin, Dallas and Houston, with the sheer number of businesses and consumers connecting to the grid overloading Texas' aging infrastructure.

Paschal added that its legacy systems are reportedly facing wear, tear and obsolescence.

Investopedia said that natural gas and wind generate most of Texas' electricity and "its infrastructure isn’t winterized against freezing temperatures." It noted that winter storm "Uri" from Feb.13-17, 2021 led to more than 210 deaths and caused almost 70 percent of Texas to be without power and 50 percent to lose water.

(Article by Olivia Cook republished from NaturalNews.com)

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