Pfizer’s mRNA vaccine makes “aberrant proteins,” warn experts concerned about autoimmunity


Roughly one out of every 10 people who got "vaccinated" for the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) with Pfizer's mRNA (modRNA) formula received something other than the spike protein-generating formula listed on the vial, new research suggests.

Scientists from the University of Cambridge discovered that roughly eight percent of the time, Pfizer's COVID injections mistranslate, resulting in the formation of "aberrant proteins" like those linked to autoimmune disease.

The primary driver of this mistranslation appears to be the modifications that Pfizer made to its mRNA bases, which are where the company put the instructions that the rest of the injection uses in conjunction with the human body to produce spike proteins.

"Our work presents both a concern and a solution for this new type of medicine," stated leading author Anne Willis in a press release.

Big Pharma's "mRNA" is actually synthetic modRNA

The way it is supposed to work is that mRNA injections are dispensed into muscle tissue before entering cells. Once inside the cells, the mRNA instructions are read and interpreted by ribosomes, which respond by producing proteins, in this case spike proteins for COVID.

With the Pfizer formulation, this process goes awry roughly one out of 10 times, creating problems for the recipient. Aberrant proteins of the kind produced one out of 10 times with the Pfizer formula are linked to autoimmune diseases, or diseases in which the immune system attacks itself.

"If the instructions are misinterpreted, errors in the final protein may be produced," writes Marina Zhang for the Epoch Times. "Some errors are minor, like misspelling one word in a text, while others are more detrimental."

"This misinterpretation is called a frameshift, which occurs when one or two mRNA bases are skipped. Since mRNA bases are translated in sets of threes, skipping a base would affect all the sequences downstream, leading to new proteins being formed."

This frameshifting process ends up leading to the creation of "multiple, unique and potentially aberrant proteins," to quote immunologist Jessica Rose, who discussed the matter in a Substack article.

Naturally occurring mRNA usually contains a compound known as uridine, but Pfizer's mRNA injections just have something called N1-methylpseudouridine. Pfizer chose N1-methylpseudouridine because it is supposed to make the mRNA sequence stronger and less prone to succumbing to immune system degradation and breakdown.

It is for this very reason (Pfizer's use of N1-methylpseudouridine) that many scientists are now referring to mRNA as modRNA since modRNA is technically what is inside Pfizer and Moderna's COVID vials. Big Pharma's modRNA is synthetic, in other words, and must be designated as such to differentiate it from naturally occurring mRNA.

As usual, the study's authors stipulate in their conclusion that there is "no evidence" to suggest that the aberrant proteins generated by Pfizer's modRNA injections are "associated with adverse outcomes." They likely have to say things like this, or feel as though they should, to avoid retribution from Pfizer.

It would also be accurate to say that there is no evidence that the aberrant proteins produced by Pfizer's modRNA injections are not associated with adverse outcomes. In fact, there is plenty of evidence to the contrary as adverse event reports are piling up sky high these days.

"Under ideal circumstances, ribosomes translate the vaccine mRNA into the S [spike] protein," commented Dr. Adonis Sfera, an assistant clinical professor of medicine at Loma Linda University.

"If the cellular machine (ribosomes) 'detects' the difference [between normal uridine and N1-methylpseudouridine], it can result in stalling or mistranslation." 

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