Ireland To Begin Imprisoning YouTubers Who Push ‘Misinformation’


The Irish government has announced plans to begin arresting YouTubers and other online influencers who publish so-called ‘misinformation’ online.

The WEF-controlled nation of Ireland is working to introduce the Irish Online Safety Code – inspired by the UK’s Online Safety Act.

The new law will give authorities the power to punish online video platforms and creators that publish content that “indirectly leads to harm.”

Reclaimthenet.org reports: One of the ways such harm would be interpreted is even if a video does not contain content of the kind – comments to it are branded as “hateful.” In other words, it’s a platform liability for third-party content. The regulation would treat it as “indissociable from user-generated videos.”

One of the consequences is absurd – as Free Speech Ireland notes, to protect themselves, video platforms would have to “censor user content that is not even regarded as ‘harmful’ under the Code.”

The rules, if adopted, would be enforced by a regulator known in Irish as Coimisiún na Meán (CnaM, “Media Commission”). Free Speech Ireland explains that CnaM has received the blessing to introduce the regulation both from the Irish government, and the EU. Age verification is also baked into the plans.

The targeted sites, known as Video-Sharing Platform Services (VSPS), include YouTube, X, and Facebook, and this particular regulation is supposed to be enforced only in Ireland.

However, given that many large tech companies have their headquarters for Europe in Dublin, this could eventually complicate the situation and bring the same kind of censorship to the users in the US as well.

Journalist Peter Caddle, who is based in Brussels, is cited as saying that it would “likely be easier to apply EU censorship rules to all users rather than to try to split the user base into EU and non-EU users.”

There is still formal time to influence all this, as the process of introducing the Online Safety Code for video platforms is now in a public consultation stage, with the deadline for submissions being the end of this month.

CnaM explains that after the conclusion of the consultation, the final version of the code will become part of Ireland’s “overall online safety framework, making digital services legally accountable for how they keep people safe online.”

The rules will incorporate the EU Digital Services Act and the EU Terrorist Content Online Regulation, with the whole package to be enforced by CnaM.

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