Climate cultists now say indoor house plants are bad for the planet


One of the most harmful things a person can do with regard to the environment is purchase indoor plants for a home or office space, as doing so "pollutes" the atmosphere with carbon, according to the Washington Post.

Writer Nicolás Rivero argues that when it comes to climate change and global warming, indoor houseplants are an environmental threat as the trucks that deliver them to the local nursery "spew carbon emissions." Likewise, the plastic pots and trays that hold indoor plants are made from petroleum.

Even though house plants "breathe in" carbon dioxide while releasing oxygen for humans and animals to breathe, the "environmental cost" of greening one's indoor spaces is too high, according to climate cultists, to legitimize their use.

"Every little thing we do adds up collectively, so if all of us are doing these things, the collective impact is quite large," says Susan Pell, director of the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington, D.C.

"The mindful act of trying to be more sustainable in one area of your daily life ... helps you to be mindful in other areas."

Stark living for the planet

According to Pell, one particular aspect of house plants that many people overlook is the distance they typically have to travel – from the places where they are grown to retail stores and to the insides of people's living and working spaces.

"A lot of major nursery suppliers are located in Florida and in California," Pell added in a statement, as quoted by the Post.

Pell recommends that climate-conscious people instead look for local plant swaps or garden clubs, which are often organized online via social media sites.

"Those groups frequently meet multiple times a year and they share not just plant cuttings and potted plants with each other, but they'll share knowledge as well and sometimes have community events," Pell noted.

Rivero also warns against using certain soil components like peat, a natural earth-based substance that forms at the bottom of bogs and wetlands. A precursor to the formation of coal, peat releases carbon dioxide (CO2) when harvested and is "not easily renewable," which makes it bad in the minds of climate cultists.

"It takes hundreds of years, if not thousands of years, to form," Pell says about peat. "We're cutting into these peatlands and eventually they'll all be harvested."

Instead of peat, Pell wants people to try peat alternatives like coconut coir or biochar, which retain water in soil mix "with less of the environmental baggage."

Pell says gardeners, both of the indoor and outdoor variety, should commit to purchasing pots, shears, plant stands, and other tools locally instead of at the store, which typically carries consumer products made in other countries like China from which they travel long distances, emitting carbon all along the way.

"I love to buy plant stands from antique stores," Pell commented about how she personally tries to save the planet. "You can often find locally made ceramic pots throughout the country and certainly in our area" near D.C.

Pell really dislikes "the cheap, black plastic pots that quickly fall apart," and instead prefers terracotta and ceramic pots that are more durable. Disposable pots can also be used, and Pell recommends those made from biodegradable materials.

Pell also advises against using fertilizer on house plants because fertilizer, according to climate cultists, is another bad thing for the environment that has got to go.

"I myself almost never fertilize my houseplants and they do just fine," Pell said. 

Post a Comment

Previous Post Next Post
Follow us on TruthSocial, X-Twitter, Gettr, Gab, VK, Anonup, Facebook and Telegram for interesting and mysterious bonus content!
If you are willing and able 👉 PayPal donate.

نموذج الاتصال