Enigmatic Saints With The Ability To Be In Two Places At Once

Enigmatic Saints With The Ability To Be In Two Places At Once

Many individuals believe that one cannot be in two distinct places at the same time, but what if it wasn’t true? The enigmatic phenomenon of “bilocation” has been found among saints throughout the history of mankind. In this phenomenon, individuals manage to bend and defy the laws of reality in order to simultaneously exist in two places at the same time.

Such a phenomenon shows the power of the forces and energies that work around us that are far from being completely understood. These energies are mysterious, confusing, and always stunning. Even though, according to the laws of physics, these acts seem to be impossible, there are several reports of saints who had the ability to do so at will. 

Other similar phenomena, like astral travel, are indifferent to bilocation. In astral travel, a person’s consciousness travels outside of their physical body, like a living ghost, while in bilocation, exactly the same physical body is present in two locations at the same time and they are capable of breathing, sweating, and generally interacting with their surroundings in a manner that would be considered normal. Bilocation is also instantaneous, unlike other sorts of out-of-body phenomena, which might take some time to go from one location to the other.

Throughout history, bilocation has been linked to saints and other religious figures, even though people have reported instances of bilocation. The power of bilocation is regarded as a divine gift bestowed by God upon those who require it in order to perform acts of mercy, such as saving someone from death or assisting someone who is ill and unable to physically be present at a specific location due to circumstances.

Even though bilocation seems to be a stunning phenomenon, it is so common in the history of the Catholic church, where its existence is accepted as fact, that the Vatican considers it one of the basic miracles required for sainthood, regards it as a sign of high religious percept, and has extensively researched and investigated the phenomenon. The cases of bilocation are not merely tales; rather, they are well documented in the church’s history and also experienced and supported by reliable sources.

St. Anthony of Padua
St. Anthony of Padua

An early narrative of bilocation comes from the 13th century. St. Anthony of Padua, a Portuguese Franciscan friar and certified medical practitioner who was highly regarded as one of the church’s greatest physicians, performed miraculous healings and was considered a prolific performer of miracles. His work earned him a titles of “The Wonder-Worker of Padua” and “Evangelical Doctor.”

Another act of bilocation by St. Anthony of Padua occurred on Holy Thursday while he was ministering at the Church of St. Pierre in Limoges. This time, he again recalled that he had to be at another place many miles away. When Anthony knelt to pray at the altar as the congregation waited, he bilocated himself to the other church some distance away and appeared out of shadow to deliver his sermon. After finishing his sermon, he again strolled back into the shadows and stood up from praying at the Church of St. Pierre in Limoges and proceeded further as if nothing had happened. Throughout this act of bilocation, he was witnessed by many churchgoers and was claimed to be physically present at both locations. One official said that “These miracles come to us on such high authority that it is impossible to either eliminate them or explain them away without doing violence to the facts of history.”

St. Francis of Paola
St. Francis of Paola

There is a large list of bilocating saints. St. Francis of Paola was famous for displaying the enigmatic power of bilocation on a regular basis. His servants would spot him occasionally performing duties in the monastery and cooking in the kitchen at the same time, with both bodies functioning normally and also interacting with the surroundings. He would also do the same thing while praying. Even when he was on vacation, he would do both — stroll on the streets and pray in the monastery simultaneously.

People who wanted to see him approached the chapel and found him so deep in prayer that they decided not to disturb him. When they returned to the street, they were surprised to see him talking to some people. They hurried back into the chapel and saw him still lost in prayer.

A witness of the bilocation performed by St. Francis of Paola

Another account of bilocation comes from the 1500s. St. Francis Xavier A former professor of philosophy at the University of Paris who traveled widely to distant places such as Ceylon, India, Japan, and Malaysia for his work during the 1540s.  He would appear at two places and even three places(trilocation) that were wide apart from each other. He would interact with the natives of those places simultaneously. He did this on such a regular basis that it all seemed normal and wouldn’t have surprised anyone who was used to spotting him doing bilocation or relocation. One tale of bilocation from the era is linked to St. Martin de Pores, who was born in 1579. Though he was a physician earlier, he ended up at the Monastery of the Holy Rosary in Lima, Peru. As he had always declined towards performing menial duties around the monastery in the name of God, that is why he did not begin as a real member of the clergy. Because of his ability to bilocate, he became famous and well known, even though he wanted to live a quiet and simple life.

In spite of the fact that Martin had been documented as never leaving the premises of the monastery, he was frequently spotted in Lima and in far-flung places like Mexico, China, Japan, Africa, and the Philippines. At those places, he would be engaged in activities like preaching and working with children, as well as tending to the sick and elderly and distributing food to the hungry.

Another well-known act of bilocation by Martin is when he went to North Africa multiple times in order to provide help and clothes to the poor. His work was greatly admired by a prisoner in Barbary, as he was also provided with help by Martin.

Later, after 10 years, when the prisoner was released, he accidentally ran into Martin in the monastery of Lima and thanked him. But Martin immediately pulled the prisoner aside and stopped him, as Martin didn’t want people to know about his supernatural power of bilocation.

It was stated that during his visits, Martin was able to communicate with the natives of the people in their respective languages, even though he had never learned any foreign languages. He was even able to bilocate himself behind closed doors, such as prison. Martin helped another prisoner who was falsely imprisoned by the Turks in Algiers. He was able to pay his own ransom after getting enough money from the bilocating saint.

Martin used to narrate his knowledge of the diverse cultures of foreign lands to the visitors of the monastery, and they were highly impressed by his knowledge. It was nearly impossible to learn so much extensive knowledge from books. No matter how much time it took to travel around foreign lands, he would always be seen performing daily tasks in the monastery. Furthermore, there was no evidence that he had ever left the monastery’s walls. It seems like Martin was living two lives simultaneously.

St. Martin’s accounts of bilocation are archived at the Vatican and have been very well recorded by the witnesses from all over the globe. On being asked how he was able to do it, Martin replied, “If God can multiply the loaves and fishes, why couldn’t he duplicate me?”

Alfonso de Liguori
Alfonso de Liguori

Another saint from Italy, named Alfonso de Liguori, or St. Alphonsus Liguori, possessed the supernatural power of bilocation. In 1774, he was a very famous bishop of St. Agata dei Goti. Once, he was spotted preaching a sermon and hearing confessions at the same time at two distinct locations.

In another case, St. Alphonsus was giving a lecture to students at a university. A poor woman visited his church to get her regular alms from him. She was told that Alphonsus was away at a sermon at that time, so she was going back without disturbing him. There were stories about him giving her alms as she was leaving, but then he disappeared again.

The most famous account of bilocation by St. Alphonsus is associated with an incident that occurred on the morning of September 21, 1774. On that morning, he abruptly collapsed into his chair after giving mass at Arrezo and entered into what one witness stated as an “extended ecstasy.” He stayed in that state the entire day and night. He didn’t move an inch and also didn’t eat anything. Although it was definitely proven that he was alive, as he was breathing and blinking periodically.

The worried servants and clergy were debating how to cure him until the doorbell rang. Behind the door was Alphonsus, and he said that he was ready to begin mass. Further, on being asked what happened, it seemed as if he was unaware of the fact that he was in a state of trance for the better part of the day and night.

Pope Clement XIV
Pope Clement XIV

Confronted with the news, he apologised and explained that he had been 100 miles away in Rome looking after the sick Pope Clement XIV. He also gave them the news that the Pope had died just now. Later on that day, the news came that the pope had passed away at the same time that Alphonsus came out of his state of trance. Also, the news stated that Alfonso de Liguori was one of the clergy present when the pope died. It seemed like a miracle because he was talking and praying with the people in Rome and, at the same time, he was in a state of trance 100 miles away, confined to a chair. In the future, he would become a saint because of his supernatural power of bilocation.

What do you think about this enigmatic power that saints possessed? So, as these accounts of bilocation are well documented and witnessed by many, can they be true or merely just a bunch of crazy stories? Leave us your thoughts below in the comment section.

Leave us your thoughts in the comment section.

Planet Today

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