COVID vaccines found to increase risk of myocarditis in children by over 13,000 percent


The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have found that Pfizer’s Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine can significantly increases the risk of myocarditis. This affects 12 to 15-year-olds the worst.

Data from the Vaccine Adverse Effects Reporting System (VAERS) show that male children in that age range have an over 133 times greater risk for myocarditis compared to the rest of the population. That’s equivalent to a 13,300 percent higher risk of developing the condition.

Myocarditis causes the inflammation of the heart muscles and reduces its ability to pump blood, causing rapid or abnormal heart rhythms. It eventually weakens the heart so the rest of the body doesn’t get enough blood, leading to a stroke or a heart attack.

The study, which looked at 1,626 cases of myocarditis, showed that the Pfizer vaccine poses the highest risk, with 105.9 cases per million doses after the second vaccine for males aged 16 to 17 and 70.7 cases per million doses after the second shot in the 12 to 15 age group.

The 18 to 24 male age group also saw higher rates of myocarditis, with 52.43 cases per million doses for Pfizer, and 56.31 cases per million doses for Moderna.

There is also a higher risk of myocarditis for females, with 6.35 cases per million doses after the second Pfizer shot in the 12 to 15 age group and 10.98 cases per million doses after the second shot in the 16 to 17 age group. A higher risk of myocarditis is also seen in the 18 to 24 age group with 4.21 cases per million doses after the second Pfizer shot, and 6.87 cases per million doses for the Moderna shot.

For older individuals, the CDC and FDA found that there is an increased risk, both male and female, for those up to the age of 49, while individuals 50 and above show little to no risk of developing myocarditis compared to the expected background rate.

Data also showed that the risk of myocarditis following Pfizer vaccination increases by 7,800 percent for males aged 16 to 17, and 2,879 percent for males aged 18 to 24.

The risk of myocarditis following Moderna injections, on the other hand, increases by at least 3,099 percent from males aged 16 to 24 and 1,568 percent for the 25 to 29 age group.

Multiple studies show similar results

Multiple studies have found that there are even greater COVID vaccine-related heart inflammation risks for young men. In November 2021, a study from Hong Kong estimated that one in 2,680 boys between 12 and 17 develop the condition within two weeks of their second Pfizer dose.

Israeli researchers also put the risk at one in 6,600 for Pfizer-vaccinated boys aged 16 to 19. This study reported an 81 percent hospitalization rate for myocarditis cases with a death rate of nearly one percent.

Another study from the United Kingdom also found that the risk of myocarditis in men under 40 is several times higher than average after mRNA vaccinations and that the post-vaccine heart inflammation may be more lethal than other forms of the disease.

Even individuals with mild cases can experience long-term problems, including greater risk of getting heart attacks later in life. The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology advise patients to refrain from participating in sporting activities for three to six months after getting myocarditis while deferring further mRNA-based COVID vaccines.

The COVID vaccines have also been linked to other serious conditions such as the Guillain Barre Syndrome and the development of blood clots.

Watch the video below to know more data linking mRNA vaccines with myocarditis.

This video is from the Data Dumper channel on Brighteon.com.

Follow Pandemic.news for more updates related to the coronavirus pandemic.

(Article by Mary Villareal republished from citizens.news)

Planet Today

Disclaimer: This article only represents the author’s view. PT is not responsible for any legal risks. The material mentions COVID-19. Trust verified information from expert sources — check out answers to questions about coronavirus and vaccinations from doctors, scientists and scientific correspondents. This article may contain statements that reflect the opinion of the author. facebook twitter telegram reddit vk pinterest youtube external-link

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