49-year-old New York Times editor dies just one day after getting Moderna booster shot

49-year-old New York Times editor dies just one day after getting Moderna booster shot

(Planet Today) New York Times Deputy Asia Editor Carlos Tejada died of a heart attack just one day after receiving the Moderna booster vaccination.

Tejada, who was just 49 years old, was married with two children and worked on the paper’s coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic, among other things. He worked at the Wall Street Journal before moving to the New York Times, where he was employed for nearly five years. According to his NYT bio, he has worked as a reporter and editor for nearly two decades in cities such as New York, Beijing, Hong Kong and Dallas.

(Article by Cassie B. republished from NaturalNews.com)

Tejada had posted on his Instagram page the day before his death about his gratitude for being able to receive the Moderna booster while working in Seoul, South Korea. He had originally received the Johnson & Johnson jab in July. Sadly, less than a day after getting the Moderna booster, he died of a heart attack.

The New York Times confirmed Tejada’s death a few days later, writing that he “helped shape coverage of the global Covid-19 crisis that won a Pulitzer Prize.”

On Instagram, Tejada wrote shortly before his death: “Double-vaxxed. Janssen-fueled, Moderna-boosted. Hey, Omicron: hit me with your wet snot” and then added that “All I had to do was fill out this form in a language I cant read. Translation software tells me I now belong to the BTS army.”

He was dead less than 24 hours later. His wife posted on Instagram: “This is Carlos’s wife, Nora. It’s with deepest sorrow that I have to share with you that Carlos passed away last night of a heart attack. I’ve lost my best friend and our kids lost a truly great dad. I will be off social media for awhile.”

NYT fails to mention Tejada got the booster the day before he died

On Substack, former New York Times journalist Alex Berenson said that Tejada did not provide informed consent to get the booster because the consent form was written in Korean, a language he was unable to read – something he joked about in one of his last posts online.

In addition, Berenson added that no clinical trials have been carried out into the efficacy of mixing two different vaccine types, as Tejada did by following the Johnson & Johnson adenovirus vector vaccine with an mRNA jab.

However, studies have shown that people who receive vaccines in rapid succession have a greater likelihood of developing heart complications like myocarditis and pericarditis. And while the New York Times did not mention Tejada receiving his booster shot less than a day before his death, Berenson said he hoped the incident would wake the newspaper up.

It’s a nice sentiment, but it seems quite unlikely at a paper that has a staunchly pro-vaccine editorial policy and all but attacks people who have raised questions about the vaccines’ safety.

Heart damage and deaths linked to vaccines

The American Heart Association has warned that mRNA vaccines can “dramatically increase the inflammation on the endothelium (inner heart membrane)” following a study of 566 patients that found a greater risk of severe heart problems following vaccination.

There is also believed to be a connection between the vaccines and the slew of recent heart health emergencies striking high-profile athletes, particularly soccer players. At first, it might have been somewhat feasible that it could have been a coincidence, but the cases keep piling up and the timing makes it clear that the vaccines are likely playing a role, even if many of their doctors are not making an effort to dig deeper and prove the connection.

A study by researchers at Columbia University estimated the true number of deaths due to COVID-19 vaccines is likely nearly 400,000. The latest count of deaths attributed to the vaccines from the CDC is 20,000, but the Columbia study found an underreporting factor of 20 in VAERS. The researchers added that their findings suggest “the risks of COVID vaccines and boosters outweigh the benefits in children, young adults and older adults with low occupational risk or previous coronavirus exposure.”

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