Blue counties in Florida where COVID-19 vaccination rates highest are driving that state’s alarming rate of new infections


(Planet Today) While there are literally millions of different viruses around the world, most of which, of course, are benign, there is one thing that defines those which afflict humans most: Mutation.

The first thing a virus does when it is met with resistance, for the most part, is to mutate so that it can continue to survive. Only when there is no host to mutate to, do most viruses finally die off.

(Article by JD Heyes republished from NaturalNews.com)

But that’s what is driving the new spike in COVID-19 infections in Florida — higher than average vaccination rates, and a vulnerable population.

Thanks to the COVID-19 vaccines, the original strain has begun to mutate and either infect persons who did not fall ill yet or reinfect even those who have been vaccinated as the new Delta variant spreads in heavily vaccinated parts of the state.

State of the Nation reported:

The three most populated counties in Florida, which have the highest Covid vaccination rates, are driving the state’s rapidly increasing rates of COVID-19 infections. In other words, the Covid shots are now the direct cause for the various surges nationwide as well as the isolated coronavirus outbreaks.

Because the Florida governor has jumped right on board the Covid Super Vaccination Agenda, the state has seen massive outbreaks of Covid and similar flu-like illnesses.

The same is true for every state that has aggressively promoted the highly experimental COVID-19 vaccines. After all, the injections have been proven conclusively to be both deadly as well as quite harmful to human health for those who are not killed by them.

You may recall that Gov. Ron DeSantis, very early on, made the right decisions by sheltering and protecting his most vulnerable population — the elderly, of which Florida has more per capita that any other state. But then he hopped aboard the vaccination train as well, and rolled them out quickly to the same populations.

Of course, DeSantis wasn’t alone: Governors all over the country responded to pressure from the Trump, and then the Biden administrations to push their people to get vaccinated, and more than 150 million did so.

Now, we have the Delta variant, and it’s proving to be more resilient and more contagious to more Americans than the original strain.

For instance, in addition to older Americans, children are testing positive and becoming ill from the Delta strain, just like influenza, which has always affected our youngest citizens and kills many children, usually thanks to pneumonia, every year.

But in Florida, the bluest counties are those that are being affected the worst by this new COVID spread — and the blue counties are the ones with the highest vaccination rates, State of the Nation reports.

“There is now indisputable evidence that proves those FL counties with the highest vaccination rates also have the highest COVID-19 infection rates,” the website noted, citing public data.

“That’s no coincidence since the Covid vaccines are well-known in the virology and epidemiology communities to cause the different Covid variant outbreaks.”

Citing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data, the website noted that 61.46 percent of Miami-Dade County residents have been vaccinated; 52.97 percent of Broward County residents are as well. And 52.51 percent of Palm Beach County residents have also gotten jabs.

“All of these counties have been driving the summertime surge in Florida, as was predicted by many medical doctors and research scientists around the world,” the website reported.

Further, State of the Nation reports that “South Florida never sees influenza cluster explosions like this in the middle of the summer, so the only explanation is the high Covid vaccination rates.”

Other sources confirm Florida’s escalating rate of infections, including among the vaccinated and among children.

“The numbers of cases in our hospitals in children and our children’s hospitals are completely overwhelmed,” Dr. Aileen Marty, an infectious disease expert at Florida International University, told CNN on Friday.