Brits Testing Negative To Covid Twice A Week To Get Special ‘Freedom Passes’ To Live ‘Normal’ lives


People who test negative for Covid twice in a week are set to receive a ‘freedom pass’ under a new UK government scheme that will allow them to live a normal life

The idea, which is all thanks to former British health secretary Jeremy Hunt, has been labled “Orwellian” by some.

Critics have even accused him of promoting ‘enslavement passes’

The Mail Online reports: The details of the scheme are still being ironed out by officials in Whitehall, who hope it will allow the country to get back to normal next year.   

To earn the freedom pass, people will need to be tested regularly and, provided the results come back negative, they will then be given a letter, card or document they can show to people as they move around. 

The certificate would be stored on a phone, according to sources, and would allow people to live a relatively normal life until the government’s vaccination programme gets up to the speed.  

It would even allow Britons to get away without wearing a mask, it is thought, and visit family and friends without the need to socially distance.  

A source told the Telegraph: ‘They will allow someone to wander down the streets, and if someone else asks why they are not wearing a mask, they can show the card, letter or an App.’

It comes after former health secretary Jeremy Hunt threw his backing behind the ‘freedom pass’ concept. 

His proposal suggests far less testing, however, with calls for Britons to be tested just once a month before being given their certificates.  

The former health secretary has called on ministers to come up with ‘proper incentives’ for people to get tested, self-isolate and receive a vaccine.

His suggestion follows recommendations by behaviour experts advising Downing Street, who said those not infected with the virus should be handed paper wristbands to allow them to return to a more normal life.

The Behavioural Insights team, also known as the ‘Nudge Unit’, also suggested lotteries at testing centres and paying for people’s travel if they go to get tested.

Mr Hunt pointed to the example of Slovakia’s mass coronavirus testing scheme, where all the countries residents aged between ten and 65 – almost four million people – were swabbed for the virus over a single weekend.

Those that tested negative were presented with a paper certificate and told they no longer needed to follow rules ordering them to stay home.


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