Empty Philippine beaches attacked thousands of “sea tomatoes”


The usually crowded beaches of the island of Palawan in the Philippines are now empty, which allows nature to flourish and return to pristine condition. Biologists have witnessed the emergence of thousands of “sea tomatoes” – pink jellyfish floating on the surface of the ocean off the coast, the Daily Mail reports.

Pink jellyfish did not sail to the Philippine shores for many years due to constant human activity. Now, bright creatures rise to the surface and approach the coastline, because they no longer feel threatened.

Specialists in marine biology at Griffith University in Australia are going to conduct additional research on this behavior of jellyfish. Biologists suggest that jellyfish appear in this area in late January or February, but because of the wind, current and tides, they only reach Palawan in March.
The atmosphere, water speed, current, tide and even geological features of the seabed can affect the appearance of jellyfish in such numbers. There are years when the population of jellyfish increases sharply, as well as years when they are few or almost nonexistent.

Scientists from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources of the Philippines believe that jellyfish signal about climate change. These creatures usually thrive in low oxygen waters.

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