Near the San Andreas Fault in the state of California, a strange moving geyser is seen


San Andreas Rift – a place famous for the eponymous Hollywood film-catastrophe. But geologists and geophysicists have known about him for a long time. San Andreas is the boundary between Pacific and North American lithospheric plates. Strong earthquakes are associated with it, the magnitude of which reaches 9 points – for example, the legendary earthquake of 1906, which led to the complete destruction of San Francisco.

Seismic activity in the fault area can cause a super-powerful earthquake, which scientists among themselves call the “Big Tryndets”. But until it happens, the state of California faces another tryndets – slow.

The moving mud geyser, which was formed back in 1953, has accelerated dozens of times and threatens infrastructure facilities. Now the mud funnel passes about 18 meters a day, throwing out water and carbon dioxide. The geyser had already gotten close to the railway line, forcing state authorities to change train routes.

The zone where the moving geyser is rampant is located on the very edge of the San Andreas Fault. Geologists associate the increased activity of the mud crater with seismic processes and believe that this may be a harbinger of more serious cataclysms.